Faculty Members

Analytical chemistry

Gerald Audette

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (Saskatchewan)
Office Location: 327C LSB
Email: audette@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 33318

Research Interests:
Protein Crystallography, Bionanotechnology, Nanomedicine, Structural Biochemistry

Research is focused on understanding how proteins function at the structural level. We employ a variety of methods, including protein X-ray crystallography, molecular biology and other biophysical methods. A detailed knowledge of a protein’s three-dimensional structure provides insight into how the protein functions, or does not function, in its biological role. Structural information also provides a framework for altering the protein’s function through protein engineering or, in the case of drug targets, structurally based drug design and modification.

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Biomolecular Interactions


Prof. Diethard Bohme headshotDiethard Bohme

Title: Distinguished Research Professor, Canada Research Chair
Academic History: PhD (McGill)
Office Location: 260 CB
Email: dkbohme@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 66188 (L 77776)

Research Interests:
Biophysical and Bioanalytical Mass Spectrometry, Gas Phase Chemistry, Kinetics and Energetics of Reactions of Bare Metal, Organometallic and Biometallic Ions, Chemistry of Interstellar and Circumstellar Environments

Research is broadly directed towards the elucidation of a wide range of fundamental kinetic, thermodynamic and mechanistic aspects of ion/molecule reactions in the gas phase and how these relate to ionic and molecular growth in partially ionized environments. The approach is both experimental and computational. Experiments are performed with a versatile Selected-Ion Flow Tube (SIFT) tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer. An inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) atomic-ion source has recently been interfaced with the SIFT to allow studies of periodic trends in bare metal-ion chemistry. Current interests lie in fundamental kinetic, catalytic and synthetic aspects of organometallic gas-phase ion chemistry and the influence of defined curved carbonaceous surfaces on metal-ion chemistry. New initiatives include studies of the intrinsic chemistry of metal ion-atom bound connectivities found within biological systems and the elucidation of gas-phase ion/molecule syntheses of biological molecules as they may proceed in interstellar environments.


Prof. Jennifer Chen headshotJennifer Chen

Title: Assistant Professor
Academic History: PhD (University of Toronto)
Office Location: 456 CB
Email: jilchen@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 22339

Research Interests:
Analytical, inorganic, Materials and Physical Chemistry

Our research focuses on the materials and physical chemistry of nanostructures with potential applications ranging from solar energy conversion to biosensing. We are interested in synthesizing and assembling nanomaterials into 3D and 2D structures via a combination of bottom-up approach and top-down lithographic technique to derive novel optical, electrical, and chemical properties. We employ a wide range of characterization methods and various optical spectroscopies to elucidate the interplay between materials properties and functions.


Demian Ifa headshotDemian Ifa

Title: Assistant Professor
Academic History: PhD (Sao Paulo)
Office Location: Office: 252 CB
Email: ifadr@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 33555

Research Interests:
Mass Spectrometry Imaging, Clinical Mass Spectrometry, Ionization Techniques, Biological Chemistry

Our research focuses on the development and application of mass spectrometry to bioanalysis. Major areas of interest are: (i) mass spectrometry imaging for the determination of the spatial distributions of chemical constituents of a tissue or other samples, (ii) chemical cross-linking for low-resolution characterization of the conformation, assembly, and interactions of macromolecules in solution, and (iii) discovery and validation of biomarkers for diagnosis and progression of disorders of clinical relevance.


Philip Johnson photoPhilip Johnson

Title: Professor
Academic History: PhD ( British Columbia)
Office Location: 414 CB
Email: pjohnson@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 33119

Research Interests:
Biological Chemistry, Nucleic Acid Chemistry,Biophysical Chemistry, Biomolecular NMR

Three-dimensional structure determination of RNA molecules and protein-RNA complexes. A combined approach of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, molecular biology techniques, and other biophysical methods to study and determine the structure of RNA molecules and protein-RNA complexes. Modern multi-dimensional multi-nuclear NMR methods that utilize isotopically enriched (13C, 15N, 2H) protein or RNA molecules are used for NMR analysis, while molecular biology techniques are used to produce the protein and RNA samples for structural studies.

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Biomolecular Interactions


Sergey Krylov headshotSergey Krylov

Title: Professor, Canada Research Chair
Academic History: PhD (Moscow State University),
Office Location: 340 PSE
Email: skrylov@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 22345 (L 22817)

Research Interests:
Bioanalytical Chemistry

This research group focuses on the development of new bioanalytical methods and instrumentation for multi-component analysis of single cells. The techniques are primarily based on separating the chemical contents of individual cells by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The molecules of interest are proteins, enzymes, and DNA. Chemical analysis methods are combined with advanced cell biology techniques such as fluorescence image cytometry. The developed bioanalytical tools are applied to study the molecular mechanisms of fundamental biological processes (cell cycle, cell differentiation, apoptosis) and human health disorders (cancer, Alzheimer disease).

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Biomolecular Interactions


Michael Siu photoK.W. Michael Siu

Title: Professor, NSERC/MDS SCIEX Chair, CRMS Director
Academic History: PhD (Dalhousie)
Office Location: 244 CB
Email: kwmsiu@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 650 8021 (L 40048)

Research Interests:
Bioanalytical & Biophysical Mass Spectrometry

Understanding the fundamentals and broadening the applications of electrospray mass spectrometry and MS/MS techniques. Building more sensitive and more versatile mass spectrometers. Interfacing mass spectrometry with ion mobility spectrometry. Studying fragmentation pathways and energetics of biological ions.

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Mass Spectrometry


Derek Wilson photoDerek Wilson

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (Western Ontario)
Office Location: 318 CB
Email: dkwilson@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 20786

Research Interests:
Protein Dynamics, Microfluidics, Time-resolved Mass Spectrometry, Biophysical NMR

Research is focused on the relationship between the conformational motions of proteins in solution (their dynamics) and their biological activity. The primary tool is Time- Resolved Electrospray Mass Spectrometry, a method that allows a wide range of active biochemical processes to be monitored on short (millisecond-to-second) timescales. This technique is combined with a number of other techniques, including biophysical NMR and H/D exchange to obtain a highly detailed, dynamic picture of protein function. There is also a significant technology development component to the work.

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Biomolecular Interactions


Muhammad Yousaf photoMuhammad Yousaf

Title: Professor
Academic History: PhD. (Chicago)
Office Location: 126E CB
Email: mnyousaf@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 77712

Research Interests:
Surface Chemistry, Biomaterials Nanoscience, Biological Chemistry, Organic Synthesis

The Yousaf Group’s research program is interdisciplinary in nature and currently focuses on 4 separate research programs based in chemistry that interface organic, bioanalytical, chemical biology and biomaterials research.
Students and postdoctoral research associates working in the group are exposed to many diverse research areas that encompass analytical chemistry, synthetic chemistry, material science, live-cell high-resolution microscopy, biochemistry and cell biology tools among many other techniques. Although we are broadly interested in several research areas, the main long-term research goal is to interface chemistry and material science with cell biology to study a range of complex processes related to cell behavior, to develop bioanalytical tools for various biotechnologies and to develop and employ biomaterials for regenerative medicine applications.

Surface Chemistry/Microfluidics/Microarrays/Nanoarrays. Interfacing surface chemistry, advanced microscopy techniques and microfluidics with cell biology to study a range of cell behaviors and to develop new biotechnology assay platforms.
This research program aims to bridge material science and cell biology with synthetic organic chemistry to develop new surface chemistry and biophysical tools to study the internal and external cues that are critical for cell polarization and cell migration. We also develop new types of biomolecular microarrays and nanoarrays compatible with MALDI mass spectrometry for a range of small molecule and proteomic studies.

Organic Chemistry/Bio-Organic. A Solution Based Switchable Chemoselective Redox Responsive (CRRL) Ligation and Release Strategy for Bioconjugation (a reversible bio-orthogonal ‘click’ chemistry).
This research program aims to use synthetic organic chemistry to develop a general dynamic ‘click’ conjugation and release strategy for new applications in chemical biology and material science.

Chemical Biology/Tissue Engineering. Developing Liposome Fusion strategies for cell surface tailoring in order to spatially and temporally control cell-cell interactions for stem cell differentiation and as a chemoselective Tissue engineering based therapy.
This research program aims to integrate synthetic organic chemistry with cell biology to tailor cell surfaces with bio-orthogonal functional groups for subsequent control of cell assembly and disassembly for stem cell differentiation and tissue engineering applications.

Biodegradable Polymers/Hydrogels. Developing novel polyketoesters that can be molded into films and particles as biodegradable, non-cytotoxic materials for tissue engineering scaffolds and as nanoparticle delivery reagents. Programmable hydrogels with control of 3D ligand presentation for studies of cell behavior and regenerative medicine applications.
This research program aims to develop new polyketoester polymers and chemoselective hydrogels for a range of biomaterial and tissue engineering applications.


Atmospheric chemistry

Prof. Jan Bottenheim headshotJan Bottenheim (adjunct)

Title: Adjunct Professor
Academic History: PhD (V.U. Amst.)
Office Location: 006 SSEB
Email: jan.bottenheim@ec.gc.ca
Website: Research Page
Phone: 416 736 5410

Research Interests:
Atmospheric Photochemistry, Computer Modelling, Arctic Air Chemistry

Affiliations:
Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry


Donald Hastie photoDonald Hastie

Title: Professor & Chair of the Chemistry Department
Academic History: PhD (Canterbury)
Office Location: 305 PSE
Email: hastie@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 5388 (L 77766)

Research Interests:
Atmospheric Chemistry

Understanding the chemical and meteorological processes responsible for the production of ozone and particulate matter in the lower atmosphere. The development and use of spectroscopic instruments to measure the chemical composition of the atmosphere. Laboratory studies on the production of particulate matter from hydrocarbon oxidation.

Affiliations:
Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry


Robert McLaren headshotRobert McLaren

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (Alberta)
Office Location: 301 PSE
Email: rmclaren@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 30675 (L 70456)

Research Interests:
Atmospheric Chemistry

Research interests are in the chemistry of air contaminants in the polluted atmosphere, including their sources, transformations and sinks. Developing analytical methods to characterize the organic and inorganic composition of the gaseous and particulate phases of the troposphere. Focus is on the measurement of oxygenated organic species. Research tools include modern instrumental methods of analysis, applied both in the laboratory and in field studies.

Affiliations:
Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry


Shao-Meng Li

Title: Adjunct Professor
Academic History: PhD (Florida State)
Office Location: 006 SSEB
Email: lshao-meng.li@ec.gc.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 5410

Research Interests:
Atmospheric Chemistry


Jochen Rudolph photoJochen Rudolph

Title: Professor
Academic History: PhD (Darmstadt)
Office Location: 006 SSEB
Email: rudolphj@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 650 8117 (L 44608)

Research Interests:
Atmospheric Chemistry

Organic trace substances in the atmosphere: Sources, sinks, reactions, atmospheric distributions, and impact on the chemistry of the troposphere. Use of isotope ratios to study the processing and origin of gas and particle phase organic compounds in the atmosphere. Measurement techniques for concentration and isotope ratios of organic substances in the atmosphere.

Affiliations:
Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry
Centre for Research in Mass Spectrometry


Biological chemistry

Prof. Gerald Audette headshotGerald Audette

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (Saskatchewan)
Office Location: 327C LSB
Email: audette@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 33318

Research Interests:
Protein Crystallography, Bionanotechnology, Nanomedicine, Structural Biochemistry

Research is focused on understanding how proteins function at the structural level. We employ a variety of methods, including protein X-ray crystallography, molecular biology and other biophysical methods. A detailed knowledge of a protein’s three-dimensional structure provides insight into how the protein functions, or does not function, in its biological role. Structural information also provides a framework for altering the protein’s function through protein engineering or, in the case of drug targets, structurally based drug design and modification.

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Biomolecular Interactions


Prof. Logan Donaldson headshotLogan Donaldson (biology)

Title: Professor
Academic History: PhD (British Columbia)
Office Location: 49 FS
Email: logand@yorku.ca
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 22823

Research Interests:
Structural Biology, NMR of Biological Molecules


Dasantila Golemi-Kotra photoDasantila Golemi-Kotra

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (Wayne State)
Office Location: 452 CB
Email: dgkotra@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone:

Research Interests:
Biological Chemistry

The focus of the research is understanding the microbial infections and how to effectively disrupt biological processes vital to bacteria and virus survival so that they become unable to invade and/or proliferate in the host. Chemical tools are used to study the molecular events that underline these biological systems.


Philip Johnson photoPhilip Johnson

Title: Professor
Academic History: PhD ( British Columbia)
Office Location: 414 CB
Email: pjohnson@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 33119

Research Interests:
Biological Chemistry, Nucleic Acid Chemistry,Biophysical Chemistry, Biomolecular NMR

Three-dimensional structure determination of RNA molecules and protein-RNA complexes. A combined approach of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, molecular biology techniques, and other biophysical methods to study and determine the structure of RNA molecules and protein-RNA complexes. Modern multi-dimensional multi-nuclear NMR methods that utilize isotopically enriched (13C, 15N, 2H) protein or RNA molecules are used for NMR analysis, while molecular biology techniques are used to produce the protein and RNA samples for structural studies.

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Biomolecular Interactions


Demian Ifa headshotDemian Ifa

Title: Assistant Professor
Academic History: PhD (Sao Paulo)
Office Location: Office: 252 CB
Email: ifadr@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 33555

Research Interests:
Mass Spectrometry Imaging, Clinical Mass Spectrometry, Ionization Techniques, Biological Chemistry

Our research focuses on the development and application of mass spectrometry to bioanalysis. Major areas of interest are: (i) mass spectrometry imaging for the determination of the spatial distributions of chemical constituents of a tissue or other samples, (ii) chemical cross-linking for low-resolution characterization of the conformation, assembly, and interactions of macromolecules in solution, and (iii) discovery and validation of biomarkers for diagnosis and progression of disorders of clinical relevance.


Sergey Krylov headshotSergey Krylov

Title: Professor, Canada Research Chair
Academic History: PhD (Moscow State University),
Office Location: 340 PSE
Email: skrylov@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 22345 (L 22817)

Research Interests:
Bioanalytical Chemistry

This research group focuses on the development of new bioanalytical methods and instrumentation for multi-component analysis of single cells. The techniques are primarily based on separating the chemical contents of individual cells by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The molecules of interest are proteins, enzymes, and DNA. Chemical analysis methods are combined with advanced cell biology techniques such as fluorescence image cytometry. The developed bioanalytical tools are applied to study the molecular mechanisms of fundamental biological processes (cell cycle, cell differentiation, apoptosis) and human health disorders (cancer, Alzheimer disease).

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Biomolecular Interactions


Michael Siu photoK.W. Michael Siu

Title: Professor, NSERC/MDS SCIEX Chair, CRMS Director
Academic History: PhD (Dalhousie)
Office Location: 244 CB
Email: kwmsiu@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 650 8021 (L 40048)

Research Interests:
Bioanalytical & Biophysical Mass Spectrometry

Understanding the fundamentals and broadening the applications of electrospray mass spectrometry and MS/MS techniques. Building more sensitive and more versatile mass spectrometers. Interfacing mass spectrometry with ion mobility spectrometry. Studying fragmentation pathways and energetics of biological ions.

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Mass Spectrometry


Valeria Tsoukanova

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (St. Petersburg State University)
Office Location: 342 PSE
Email: valeriat@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 20015

Research Interests:
Physical Chemistry, Biophysical Chemistry, Biomaterials

Studying the self-assembly of lipids, polymers and biomolecules, and engineering membrane-mimetic surfaces for biomedical applications. By performing epi-flourescence microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Brewster angle microscopy, imaging ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy in-situ surface characterizations, we seek to advance the knowledge on how the structure and local properties of self-assembled membrane-mimetic surfaces can be controlled through tailoring the structure, size, conformation and concentration of lipids, polymers and biomolecules. This knowledge is then used for the design of tissue-contacting layers on the surface of implanted medical devices and vesicles for drug delivery.


Derek Wilson photoDerek Wilson

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (Western Ontario)
Office Location: 318 CB
Email: dkwilson@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 20786

Research Interests:
Protein Dynamics, Microfluidics, Time-resolved Mass Spectrometry, Biophysical NMR

Research is focused on the relationship between the conformational motions of proteins in solution (their dynamics) and their biological activity. The primary tool is Time- Resolved Electrospray Mass Spectrometry, a method that allows a wide range of active biochemical processes to be monitored on short (millisecond-to-second) timescales. This technique is combined with a number of other techniques, including biophysical NMR and H/D exchange to obtain a highly detailed, dynamic picture of protein function. There is also a significant technology development component to the work.

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Biomolecular Interactions


Muhammad Yousaf photoMuhammad Yousaf

Title: Professor
Academic History: PhD. (Chicago)
Office Location: 126E CB
Email: mnyousaf@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 77712

Research Interests:
Surface Chemistry, Biomaterials Nanoscience, Biological Chemistry, Organic Synthesis

The Yousaf Group’s research program is interdisciplinary in nature and currently focuses on 4 separate research programs based in chemistry that interface organic, bioanalytical, chemical biology and biomaterials research.
Students and postdoctoral research associates working in the group are exposed to many diverse research areas that encompass analytical chemistry, synthetic chemistry, material science, live-cell high-resolution microscopy, biochemistry and cell biology tools among many other techniques. Although we are broadly interested in several research areas, the main long-term research goal is to interface chemistry and material science with cell biology to study a range of complex processes related to cell behavior, to develop bioanalytical tools for various biotechnologies and to develop and employ biomaterials for regenerative medicine applications.

Surface Chemistry/Microfluidics/Microarrays/Nanoarrays. Interfacing surface chemistry, advanced microscopy techniques and microfluidics with cell biology to study a range of cell behaviors and to develop new biotechnology assay platforms.
This research program aims to bridge material science and cell biology with synthetic organic chemistry to develop new surface chemistry and biophysical tools to study the internal and external cues that are critical for cell polarization and cell migration. We also develop new types of biomolecular microarrays and nanoarrays compatible with MALDI mass spectrometry for a range of small molecule and proteomic studies.

Organic Chemistry/Bio-Organic. A Solution Based Switchable Chemoselective Redox Responsive (CRRL) Ligation and Release Strategy for Bioconjugation (a reversible bio-orthogonal ‘click’ chemistry).
This research program aims to use synthetic organic chemistry to develop a general dynamic ‘click’ conjugation and release strategy for new applications in chemical biology and material science.

Chemical Biology/Tissue Engineering. Developing Liposome Fusion strategies for cell surface tailoring in order to spatially and temporally control cell-cell interactions for stem cell differentiation and as a chemoselective Tissue engineering based therapy.
This research program aims to integrate synthetic organic chemistry with cell biology to tailor cell surfaces with bio-orthogonal functional groups for subsequent control of cell assembly and disassembly for stem cell differentiation and tissue engineering applications.

Biodegradable Polymers/Hydrogels. Developing novel polyketoesters that can be molded into films and particles as biodegradable, non-cytotoxic materials for tissue engineering scaffolds and as nanoparticle delivery reagents. Programmable hydrogels with control of 3D ligand presentation for studies of cell behavior and regenerative medicine applications.
This research program aims to develop new polyketoester polymers and chemoselective hydrogels for a range of biomaterial and tissue engineering applications.


Inorganic chemistry

Prof. Jennifer Chen headshotJennifer Chen

Title: Assistant Professor
Academic History: PhD (University of Toronto)
Office Location: 456 CB
Email: jilchen@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 22339

Research Interests:
Analytical, inorganic, Materials and Physical Chemistry

Our research focuses on the materials and physical chemistry of nanostructures with potential applications ranging from solar energy conversion to biosensing. We are interested in synthesizing and assembling nanomaterials into 3D and 2D structures via a combination of bottom-up approach and top-down lithographic technique to derive novel optical, electrical, and chemical properties. We employ a wide range of characterization methods and various optical spectroscopies to elucidate the interplay between materials properties and functions.


Gino Lavoie photoGino Lavoie

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Office Location: 145 PSE
Email: glavoie@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 77728

Research Interests:
Inorganic Chemistry, Polymers, Organometallics, Catalysis

More than 90 per cent of the chemicals produced today require the use of catalysts. Continual development of transition metal complexes and study of their reactivity is thus essential to further decrease the energy requirements of large scale production of chemicals, to improve yield and selectivity of reactions, and to allow for the preparation of new compounds and materials with tailored properties. This research group investigates the use of transition metal complexes with novel ligand architectures in conventional solvents and in greener alternatives (1) for the activation and transformation of inert molecules, such as dinitrogen, carbon dioxide and methane, and (2) for the preparation of new materials by the controlled addition polymerization of functional group containing olefins. Reaction mechanisms are elucidated by a series of tools including in situ spectroscopy and isotopic labelling.


Barry Lever photoA. B. P. Lever (Barry)

Title: Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus
Academic History: PhD (London)
Office Location: 141 PSE
Email: blever@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 22309

Research Interests:
Bioinorganic Chemistry, Electrochemistry, Electronic and Vibrational Spectroscopy, Solar Energy Conversion

Electroanalytical chemistry, computational chemistry, electrochemistry and synthetic inorganic chemistry. Surface electrochemical techniques with modified electrodes and their application to chemical sensors. Design of complexes with redox active terminal and bridging ligands using a wealth of physical techniques and computational methods (ZINDO, DFT and time dependent DFT) to understand the electronic structures of such species as a function of net oxidation state. Development of electrochemical ligand parameters for use in a wide variety of applications.


William Pietro photoWilliam Pietro

Title: Professor
Academic History: PhD (California)
Office Location: 138 PSE
Email: pietro@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 77700 (L 77720)

Research Interests:
Inorganic Chemistry, Materials Chemistry

Materials research, molecular electronics. Studies of novel semiconducting materials which are actual hybrids of conventional and molecular electronic devices. Fabrication of cadmium sulfide semiconductor nanoclusters that possess a chemically active surface. Such surfaces contain a number of possible functionalities imparting the cluster with the ability to covalently bind a variety of interesting molecular devices. Investigations of the applications of these new materials towards electrooptic devices, chemical sensors and molecular transistors.


Pierre Potvin photoPierre Potvin

Title: Professor
Academic History: PhD (McGill)
Office Location: 406 CB
Email: pgpotvin@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 66140 (L 70162)

Research Interests:
Ligand Synthesis, Coordination Chemistry, Electrocatalysts & Photocatalysts relevant to energy sources

Design and synthesis of ligands for metals, assembly of simple and multimetallic complexes and assessment of their properties, especially in catalysis. Recent work has centred on Ru complexes as novel photosensitizers for photo-cleavage of water into its elements, as electrocatalysts for carbon dioxide reduction and as electron wires. See www.chem.yorku.ca/profs/potvin for more detail.


Materials chemistry

Prof. Jennifer Chen headshotJennifer Chen

Title: Assistant Professor
Academic History: PhD (University of Toronto)
Office Location: 456 CB
Email: jilchen@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 22339

Research Interests:
Analytical, inorganic, Materials and Physical Chemistry

Our research focuses on the materials and physical chemistry of nanostructures with potential applications ranging from solar energy conversion to biosensing. We are interested in synthesizing and assembling nanomaterials into 3D and 2D structures via a combination of bottom-up approach and top-down lithographic technique to derive novel optical, electrical, and chemical properties. We employ a wide range of characterization methods and various optical spectroscopies to elucidate the interplay between materials properties and functions.


Gino Lavoie photoGino Lavoie

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Office Location: 145 PSE
Email: glavoie@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 77728

Research Interests:
Inorganic Chemistry, Polymers, Organometallics, Catalysis

More than 90 per cent of the chemicals produced today require the use of catalysts. Continual development of transition metal complexes and study of their reactivity is thus essential to further decrease the energy requirements of large scale production of chemicals, to improve yield and selectivity of reactions, and to allow for the preparation of new compounds and materials with tailored properties. This research group investigates the use of transition metal complexes with novel ligand architectures in conventional solvents and in greener alternatives (1) for the activation and transformation of inert molecules, such as dinitrogen, carbon dioxide and methane, and (2) for the preparation of new materials by the controlled addition polymerization of functional group containing olefins. Reaction mechanisms are elucidated by a series of tools including in situ spectroscopy and isotopic labelling.


Sylvie Morin photoSylvie Morin

Title: Associate Professor, Canada Research Chair
Academic History: PhD (Ottawa)
Office Location: 346 PSE
Email: smorin@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 22303 (L 20477/33870)

Research Interests:
Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, Electrochemistry, Metal Deposition, Nanostructures

The general goal of the research is to find the relationships between the structure of electrodeposited metal films and nanostructures and some of their magnetic, electronic and catalytic properties. Many parameters can affect the metal growth — the applied current, concentration of the metal ions, temperature, and the structure of the surface — and their effects on the growth of thin films and nanostructure is not well understood. Electrochemical techniques coupled with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) is the method of choice for these studies. Several projects are underway in related areas including the growth and characterization of electrodeposited magnetic thin films.


William Pietro photoWilliam Pietro

Title: Professor
Academic History: PhD (California)
Office Location: 138 PSE
Email: pietro@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 77700 (L 77720)

Research Interests:
Inorganic Chemistry, Materials Chemistry

Materials research, molecular electronics. Studies of novel semiconducting materials which are actual hybrids of conventional and molecular electronic devices. Fabrication of cadmium sulfide semiconductor nanoclusters that possess a chemically active surface. Such surfaces contain a number of possible functionalities imparting the cluster with the ability to covalently bind a variety of interesting molecular devices. Investigations of the applications of these new materials towards electrooptic devices, chemical sensors and molecular transistors.


Valeria Tsoukanova

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (St. Petersburg State University)
Office Location: 342 PSE
Email: valeriat@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 20015

Research Interests:
Physical Chemistry, Biophysical Chemistry, Biomaterials

Studying the self-assembly of lipids, polymers and biomolecules, and engineering membrane-mimetic surfaces for biomedical applications. By performing epi-flourescence microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Brewster angle microscopy, imaging ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy in-situ surface characterizations, we seek to advance the knowledge on how the structure and local properties of self-assembled membrane-mimetic surfaces can be controlled through tailoring the structure, size, conformation and concentration of lipids, polymers and biomolecules. This knowledge is then used for the design of tissue-contacting layers on the surface of implanted medical devices and vesicles for drug delivery.


Muhammad Yousaf photoMuhammad Yousaf

Title: Professor
Academic History: PhD. (Chicago)
Office Location: 126E CB
Email: mnyousaf@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 77712

Research Interests:
Surface Chemistry, Biomaterials Nanoscience, Biological Chemistry, Organic Synthesis

The Yousaf Group’s research program is interdisciplinary in nature and currently focuses on 4 separate research programs based in chemistry that interface organic, bioanalytical, chemical biology and biomaterials research.
Students and postdoctoral research associates working in the group are exposed to many diverse research areas that encompass analytical chemistry, synthetic chemistry, material science, live-cell high-resolution microscopy, biochemistry and cell biology tools among many other techniques. Although we are broadly interested in several research areas, the main long-term research goal is to interface chemistry and material science with cell biology to study a range of complex processes related to cell behavior, to develop bioanalytical tools for various biotechnologies and to develop and employ biomaterials for regenerative medicine applications.

Surface Chemistry/Microfluidics/Microarrays/Nanoarrays. Interfacing surface chemistry, advanced microscopy techniques and microfluidics with cell biology to study a range of cell behaviors and to develop new biotechnology assay platforms.
This research program aims to bridge material science and cell biology with synthetic organic chemistry to develop new surface chemistry and biophysical tools to study the internal and external cues that are critical for cell polarization and cell migration. We also develop new types of biomolecular microarrays and nanoarrays compatible with MALDI mass spectrometry for a range of small molecule and proteomic studies.

Organic Chemistry/Bio-Organic. A Solution Based Switchable Chemoselective Redox Responsive (CRRL) Ligation and Release Strategy for Bioconjugation (a reversible bio-orthogonal ‘click’ chemistry).
This research program aims to use synthetic organic chemistry to develop a general dynamic ‘click’ conjugation and release strategy for new applications in chemical biology and material science.

Chemical Biology/Tissue Engineering. Developing Liposome Fusion strategies for cell surface tailoring in order to spatially and temporally control cell-cell interactions for stem cell differentiation and as a chemoselective Tissue engineering based therapy.
This research program aims to integrate synthetic organic chemistry with cell biology to tailor cell surfaces with bio-orthogonal functional groups for subsequent control of cell assembly and disassembly for stem cell differentiation and tissue engineering applications.

Biodegradable Polymers/Hydrogels. Developing novel polyketoesters that can be molded into films and particles as biodegradable, non-cytotoxic materials for tissue engineering scaffolds and as nanoparticle delivery reagents. Programmable hydrogels with control of 3D ligand presentation for studies of cell behavior and regenerative medicine applications.
This research program aims to develop new polyketoester polymers and chemoselective hydrogels for a range of biomaterial and tissue engineering applications.


Organic chemistry

Edward Lee-Ruff photoEdward Lee-Ruff

Title: Professor Emeritus
Academic History: PhD (McGill)
Office Location: 420 CB
Email: leeruff@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 5443 (L 70147)

Research Interests:
Organic Synthesis, Photochemistry

Medicinal chemistry and physical organic chemistry. Development of novel methods for the preparation of nucleosides, a class of compounds effective as antiviral and anticancer agents. Modifications of nucleoside synthesis to polymer support reactions and their use in combinatorial chemistry. Novel preparations of oligosaccharides. Study of reactive intermediates generated by photochemical methods using time-resolved spectroscopy. Chemistry of small ring and strained organic molecules.


Clifford Leznoff photoClifford Leznoff

Title: Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus
Academic History: PhD (McGill)
Office Location: 448 CB
Email: leznoff@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 33838 (L 77859)

Research Interests:
Organic Chemistry, Synthetic Organic Chemistry

Synthesis of unusual phthalocyanines and analogs for use in photodynamic therapy of cancer tumours, non-linear optics and catalysis. Adjacently substituted phthalocyanines, polyalkynyl substituted phthalocyanines, multinuclear phthalocyanines, and more recently attempts to make N-alkylated phthalocyanines are actively being pursued. Studies on the mechanism of phthalocyanine formation. Synthesis of phthalocyanines on polymer supports.

Affiliations:
Combinatorial Chemistry Facility


Arturo Orellana photoArturo (Art) Orellana

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (British Columbia)
Office Location: 440 CB
Email: aorellan@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 70760

Research Interests:
Natural Products Synthesis, Synthetic Methods

Natural products total synthesis and new reaction development. Studies involve the synthesis of complex natural products that display important biological activity and may serve as leads to therapeutic agents. These synthetic efforts allow access to important natural products that are often found in low abundance and facilitate further biological evaluation. In addition, synthetic intermediates that are structurally related to the natural product but which may not be otherwise accessible can also be evaluated for biological activity. Studies also involve the development of new methods for the synthesis of carbocyclic and heterocyclic compounds that may find use in medicinal chemistry or natural products synthesis.


Michael Organ photoMichael Organ (adjunct)

Title: Adjunct Professor
Academic History: PhD (Guelph)
Office Location: 460 CB
Email: organ@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 5313 (L 70149)

Research Interests:
Organic Chemistry, Combinatorial Chemistry

Synthetic and mechanistic organic chemistry studies include the development of new synthetic methodologies that are used directly in the synthesis of natural products and compounds of pharmaceutical interest. New techniques are also being developed in the area of combinatorial chemistry in close collaboration with researchers in industry in the new Combinatorial Chemistry Centre at York University.


Pierre Potvin photoPierre Potvin

Title: Professor
Academic History: PhD (McGill)
Office Location: 406 CB
Email: pgpotvin@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 66140 (L 70162)

Research Interests:
Ligand Synthesis, Coordination Chemistry, Electrocatalysts & Photocatalysts relevant to energy sources

Design and synthesis of ligands for metals, assembly of simple and multimetallic complexes and assessment of their properties, especially in catalysis. Recent work has centred on Ru complexes as novel photosensitizers for photo-cleavage of water into its elements, as electrocatalysts for carbon dioxide reduction and as electron wires. See www.chem.yorku.ca/profs/potvin for more detail.


Muhammad Yousaf photoMuhammad Yousaf

Title: Professor
Academic History: PhD. (Chicago)
Office Location: 126E CB
Email: mnyousaf@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 77712

Research Interests:
Surface Chemistry, Biomaterials Nanoscience, Biological Chemistry, Organic Synthesis

The Yousaf Group’s research program is interdisciplinary in nature and currently focuses on 4 separate research programs based in chemistry that interface organic, bioanalytical, chemical biology and biomaterials research.
Students and postdoctoral research associates working in the group are exposed to many diverse research areas that encompass analytical chemistry, synthetic chemistry, material science, live-cell high-resolution microscopy, biochemistry and cell biology tools among many other techniques. Although we are broadly interested in several research areas, the main long-term research goal is to interface chemistry and material science with cell biology to study a range of complex processes related to cell behavior, to develop bioanalytical tools for various biotechnologies and to develop and employ biomaterials for regenerative medicine applications.

Surface Chemistry/Microfluidics/Microarrays/Nanoarrays. Interfacing surface chemistry, advanced microscopy techniques and microfluidics with cell biology to study a range of cell behaviors and to develop new biotechnology assay platforms.
This research program aims to bridge material science and cell biology with synthetic organic chemistry to develop new surface chemistry and biophysical tools to study the internal and external cues that are critical for cell polarization and cell migration. We also develop new types of biomolecular microarrays and nanoarrays compatible with MALDI mass spectrometry for a range of small molecule and proteomic studies.

Organic Chemistry/Bio-Organic. A Solution Based Switchable Chemoselective Redox Responsive (CRRL) Ligation and Release Strategy for Bioconjugation (a reversible bio-orthogonal ‘click’ chemistry).
This research program aims to use synthetic organic chemistry to develop a general dynamic ‘click’ conjugation and release strategy for new applications in chemical biology and material science.

Chemical Biology/Tissue Engineering. Developing Liposome Fusion strategies for cell surface tailoring in order to spatially and temporally control cell-cell interactions for stem cell differentiation and as a chemoselective Tissue engineering based therapy.
This research program aims to integrate synthetic organic chemistry with cell biology to tailor cell surfaces with bio-orthogonal functional groups for subsequent control of cell assembly and disassembly for stem cell differentiation and tissue engineering applications.

Biodegradable Polymers/Hydrogels. Developing novel polyketoesters that can be molded into films and particles as biodegradable, non-cytotoxic materials for tissue engineering scaffolds and as nanoparticle delivery reagents. Programmable hydrogels with control of 3D ligand presentation for studies of cell behavior and regenerative medicine applications.
This research program aims to develop new polyketoester polymers and chemoselective hydrogels for a range of biomaterial and tissue engineering applications.


Physical/Theoretical chemistry

Prof. Diethard Bohme headshotDiethard Bohme

Title: Distinguished Research Professor, Canada Research Chair
Academic History: PhD (McGill)
Office Location: 260 CB
Email: dkbohme@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 66188 (L 77776)

Research Interests:
Biophysical and Bioanalytical Mass Spectrometry, Gas Phase Chemistry, Kinetics and Energetics of Reactions of Bare Metal, Organometallic and Biometallic Ions, Chemistry of Interstellar and Circumstellar Environments

Research is broadly directed towards the elucidation of a wide range of fundamental kinetic, thermodynamic and mechanistic aspects of ion/molecule reactions in the gas phase and how these relate to ionic and molecular growth in partially ionized environments. The approach is both experimental and computational. Experiments are performed with a versatile Selected-Ion Flow Tube (SIFT) tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer. An inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) atomic-ion source has recently been interfaced with the SIFT to allow studies of periodic trends in bare metal-ion chemistry. Current interests lie in fundamental kinetic, catalytic and synthetic aspects of organometallic gas-phase ion chemistry and the influence of defined curved carbonaceous surfaces on metal-ion chemistry. New initiatives include studies of the intrinsic chemistry of metal ion-atom bound connectivities found within biological systems and the elucidation of gas-phase ion/molecule syntheses of biological molecules as they may proceed in interstellar environments.


Prof. Jennifer Chen headshotJennifer Chen

Title: Assistant Professor
Academic History: PhD (University of Toronto)
Office Location: 456 CB
Email: jilchen@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 22339

Research Interests:
Analytical, inorganic, Materials and Physical Chemistry

Our research focuses on the materials and physical chemistry of nanostructures with potential applications ranging from solar energy conversion to biosensing. We are interested in synthesizing and assembling nanomaterials into 3D and 2D structures via a combination of bottom-up approach and top-down lithographic technique to derive novel optical, electrical, and chemical properties. We employ a wide range of characterization methods and various optical spectroscopies to elucidate the interplay between materials properties and functions.


Rene Fournier photoRené Fournier

Title: Professor
Academic History: PhD (Montreal)
Office Location: 303 PSE
Email: renef@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 30687

Research Interests:
Computational Chemistry

Theoretical chemistry applied to transition metal complexes, atomic clusters, surfaces, and alloy materials. Methods of Kohn-Sham molecular orbital theory are used to predict the structure, spectra, and thermochemical properties of molecules and small clusters. New methods are developed for electronic structure and atomistic simulations in large systems, and for global optimization problems.

Alan Hopkinson photoAlan Hopkinson

Title: Professor Emeritus
Academic History: PhD (Sheffield)
Office Location: 248 CB
Email: ach@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 77839

Research Interests:
Physical and Theoretical Organic Chemistry

Application of theory to mechanistic problems arising in reactions occurring in both gas-phase ion chemistry and in strong acid solutions. Accurate calculation of thermodynamic properties such as enthalpies of formation, ionization energies, electron affinities and proton affinities. Classes of molecules examined recently in combined theory/experimental studies include organosilicon compounds, chlorocarbons, chloramines, complexes of Mg+ with specific emphasis on N-containing ligands, amino acid and peptide complexes of Ag+, destabilized carbocations and noble gas complexes. The mechanism of fragmentation of protonated and argentinated tripeptides using density functional theory.

Sylvie Morin photoSylvie Morin

Title: Associate Professor, Canada Research Chair
Academic History: PhD (Ottawa)
Office Location: 346 PSE
Email: smorin@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 22303 (L 20477/33870)

Research Interests:
Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, Electrochemistry, Metal Deposition, Nanostructures

The general goal of the research is to find the relationships between the structure of electrodeposited metal films and nanostructures and some of their magnetic, electronic and catalytic properties. Many parameters can affect the metal growth — the applied current, concentration of the metal ions, temperature, and the structure of the surface — and their effects on the growth of thin films and nanostructure is not well understood. Electrochemical techniques coupled with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) is the method of choice for these studies. Several projects are underway in related areas including the growth and characterization of electrodeposited magnetic thin films.


Michael Siu photoK.W. Michael Siu

Title: Professor, NSERC/MDS SCIEX Chair, CRMS Director
Academic History: PhD (Dalhousie)
Office Location: 244 CB
Email: kwmsiu@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 650 8021 (L 40048)

Research Interests:
Bioanalytical & Biophysical Mass Spectrometry

Understanding the fundamentals and broadening the applications of electrospray mass spectrometry and MS/MS techniques. Building more sensitive and more versatile mass spectrometers. Interfacing mass spectrometry with ion mobility spectrometry. Studying fragmentation pathways and energetics of biological ions.

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Mass Spectrometry


Valeria Tsoukanova

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (St. Petersburg State University)
Office Location: 342 PSE
Email: valeriat@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 20015

Research Interests:
Physical Chemistry, Biophysical Chemistry, Biomaterials

Studying the self-assembly of lipids, polymers and biomolecules, and engineering membrane-mimetic surfaces for biomedical applications. By performing epi-flourescence microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Brewster angle microscopy, imaging ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy in-situ surface characterizations, we seek to advance the knowledge on how the structure and local properties of self-assembled membrane-mimetic surfaces can be controlled through tailoring the structure, size, conformation and concentration of lipids, polymers and biomolecules. This knowledge is then used for the design of tissue-contacting layers on the surface of implanted medical devices and vesicles for drug delivery.


Research Centres

Centre for research in mass spectrometry (CRMS)

The Center for Research in Mass Spectrometry (CRMS) is an internationally-recognized ORU focusing on mass spectrometry and related research. CRMS embodies a long-standing area of strength in FSc, with world-class contributions to research areas ranging from gas-phase ion chemistry to clinical proteomics. CRMS continues to provide research leadership, a focus for research intensification and a platform for advancement and outreach to the Faculty of Science at York Univeristy.

Prof. Diethard Bohme headshotDiethard Bohme

Title: Distinguished Research Professor, Canada Research Chair
Academic History: PhD (McGill)
Office Location: 260 CB
Email: dkbohme@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 66188 (L 77776)

Research Interests:
Biophysical and Bioanalytical Mass Spectrometry, Gas Phase Chemistry, Kinetics and Energetics of Reactions of Bare Metal, Organometallic and Biometallic Ions, Chemistry of Interstellar and Circumstellar Environments

Research is broadly directed towards the elucidation of a wide range of fundamental kinetic, thermodynamic and mechanistic aspects of ion/molecule reactions in the gas phase and how these relate to ionic and molecular growth in partially ionized environments. The approach is both experimental and computational. Experiments are performed with a versatile Selected-Ion Flow Tube (SIFT) tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer. An inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) atomic-ion source has recently been interfaced with the SIFT to allow studies of periodic trends in bare metal-ion chemistry. Current interests lie in fundamental kinetic, catalytic and synthetic aspects of organometallic gas-phase ion chemistry and the influence of defined curved carbonaceous surfaces on metal-ion chemistry. New initiatives include studies of the intrinsic chemistry of metal ion-atom bound connectivities found within biological systems and the elucidation of gas-phase ion/molecule syntheses of biological molecules as they may proceed in interstellar environments.


Alan Hopkinson photoAlan Hopkinson

Title: Professor Emeritus
Academic History: PhD (Sheffield)
Office Location: 248 CB
Email: ach@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 77839

Research Interests:
Physical and Theoretical Organic Chemistry

Application of theory to mechanistic problems arising in reactions occurring in both gas-phase ion chemistry and in strong acid solutions. Accurate calculation of thermodynamic properties such as enthalpies of formation, ionization energies, electron affinities and proton affinities. Classes of molecules examined recently in combined theory/experimental studies include organosilicon compounds, chlorocarbons, chloramines, complexes of Mg+ with specific emphasis on N-containing ligands, amino acid and peptide complexes of Ag+, destabilized carbocations and noble gas complexes. The mechanism of fragmentation of protonated and argentinated tripeptides using density functional theory.

Sylvie Morin photoSylvie Morin

Title: Associate Professor, Canada Research Chair
Academic History: PhD (Ottawa)
Office Location: 346 PSE
Email: smorin@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 22303 (L 20477/33870)

Research Interests:
Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, Electrochemistry, Metal Deposition, Nanostructures

The general goal of the research is to find the relationships between the structure of electrodeposited metal films and nanostructures and some of their magnetic, electronic and catalytic properties. Many parameters can affect the metal growth — the applied current, concentration of the metal ions, temperature, and the structure of the surface — and their effects on the growth of thin films and nanostructure is not well understood. Electrochemical techniques coupled with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) is the method of choice for these studies. Several projects are underway in related areas including the growth and characterization of electrodeposited magnetic thin films.


Demian Ifa headshotDemian Ifa

Title: Assistant Professor
Academic History: PhD (Sao Paulo)
Office Location: Office: 252 CB
Email: ifadr@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 33555

Research Interests:
Mass Spectrometry Imaging, Clinical Mass Spectrometry, Ionization Techniques, Biological Chemistry

Our research focuses on the development and application of mass spectrometry to bioanalysis. Major areas of interest are: (i) mass spectrometry imaging for the determination of the spatial distributions of chemical constituents of a tissue or other samples, (ii) chemical cross-linking for low-resolution characterization of the conformation, assembly, and interactions of macromolecules in solution, and (iii) discovery and validation of biomarkers for diagnosis and progression of disorders of clinical relevance.


Sergey Krylov headshotSergey Krylov

Title: Professor, Canada Research Chair
Academic History: PhD (Moscow State University),
Office Location: 340 PSE
Email: skrylov@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 22345 (L 22817)

Research Interests:
Bioanalytical Chemistry

This research group focuses on the development of new bioanalytical methods and instrumentation for multi-component analysis of single cells. The techniques are primarily based on separating the chemical contents of individual cells by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The molecules of interest are proteins, enzymes, and DNA. Chemical analysis methods are combined with advanced cell biology techniques such as fluorescence image cytometry. The developed bioanalytical tools are applied to study the molecular mechanisms of fundamental biological processes (cell cycle, cell differentiation, apoptosis) and human health disorders (cancer, Alzheimer disease).

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Biomolecular Interactions


photo of John McDermottJohn McDermott (biology)

Title: Professor and McLaughlin Research Chair
Academic History: PhD (Dalhousie)
Office Location: 427B LSB
Email: jmcderm@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 30344

Research Interests:
Animal Biology/Physiology, Cell-Signaling, Molecular Biology

Our research interest concerns the basic regulatory mechanisms involved in cellular differentiation. This work is primarily undertaken using muscle cells as a model system and is aimed at understanding the role of transcription factors in orchestrating muscle-specific differentiation.


Michael Siu photoK.W. Michael Siu

Title: Professor, NSERC/MDS SCIEX Chair, CRMS Director
Academic History: PhD (Dalhousie)
Office Location: 244 CB
Email: kwmsiu@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 650 8021 (L 40048)

Research Interests:
Bioanalytical & Biophysical Mass Spectrometry

Understanding the fundamentals and broadening the applications of electrospray mass spectrometry and MS/MS techniques. Building more sensitive and more versatile mass spectrometers. Interfacing mass spectrometry with ion mobility spectrometry. Studying fragmentation pathways and energetics of biological ions.

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Mass Spectrometry


Derek Wilson photoDerek Wilson

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (Western Ontario)
Office Location: 318 CB
Email: dkwilson@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 20786

Research Interests:
Protein Dynamics, Microfluidics, Time-resolved Mass Spectrometry, Biophysical NMR

Research is focused on the relationship between the conformational motions of proteins in solution (their dynamics) and their biological activity. The primary tool is Time- Resolved Electrospray Mass Spectrometry, a method that allows a wide range of active biochemical processes to be monitored on short (millisecond-to-second) timescales. This technique is combined with a number of other techniques, including biophysical NMR and H/D exchange to obtain a highly detailed, dynamic picture of protein function. There is also a significant technology development component to the work.

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Biomolecular Interactions


Centre for research in biomolecular interactions (CRBI)

Our Combinatorial Chemistry Facility provides support for high throughput analysis with instrumentation for LC/MS, LC/MS/MS, and a 600 MHz NMR.

Please visit York Research for more information.

Prof. Gerald Audette headshotGerald Audette

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (Saskatchewan)
Office Location: 327C LSB
Email: audette@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 33318

Research Interests:
Protein Crystallography, Bionanotechnology, Nanomedicine, Structural Biochemistry

Research is focused on understanding how proteins function at the structural level. We employ a variety of methods, including protein X-ray crystallography, molecular biology and other biophysical methods. A detailed knowledge of a protein’s three-dimensional structure provides insight into how the protein functions, or does not function, in its biological role. Structural information also provides a framework for altering the protein’s function through protein engineering or, in the case of drug targets, structurally based drug design and modification.

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Biomolecular Interactions


Mark Bayfield (biology)

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (Brown)
Office Location: 327E LSB
Email: bayfield@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 44085

Research Interests:
Microbiology, RNA Biology, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Genetics

My research focuses on how conserved mechanisms in RNA metabolism function in both general cellular processes and adaptations to stress.


Sam Benchimol (biology)

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (Toronto)
Office Location: 243 FB
Email: benchimo@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 20726

Research Interests:
Molecular and Cellular Biology, Tumor Suppressor Genes, Apoptosis, Senescence and Cancer

Research is directed at understanding how the p53 tumour suppressor protein regulates cell cycle progression and apoptosis in mammalian cells; and understanding the signalling pathways that lead to cell survival.


photo of Katalin HudakKatalin Hudak (biology)

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (Waterloo)
Office Location: A304B FB
Email: hudak@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 33470

Research Interests:
Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, Plant Biology, Biotechnology

One of my areas of interest is to determine how PAP detects viral RNAs. In cell free systems, PAP binds to the 5’ cap structure present on some viral RNAs and depurinates these RNAs. However, not all viral RNAs known to be inhibited by PAP are capped. For example, Poliovirus contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES), indicating that PAP may recognize other features of viral RNAs. By identifying the sequences of PAP that bind particular viral RNA structures, it may be possible to design a protein that specifically depurinates these RNAs.


Philip Johnson photoPhilip Johnson

Title: Professor
Academic History: PhD ( British Columbia)
Office Location: 414 CB
Email: pjohnson@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 33119

Research Interests:
Biological Chemistry, Nucleic Acid Chemistry,Biophysical Chemistry, Biomolecular NMR

Three-dimensional structure determination of RNA molecules and protein-RNA complexes. A combined approach of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, molecular biology techniques, and other biophysical methods to study and determine the structure of RNA molecules and protein-RNA complexes. Modern multi-dimensional multi-nuclear NMR methods that utilize isotopically enriched (13C, 15N, 2H) protein or RNA molecules are used for NMR analysis, while molecular biology techniques are used to produce the protein and RNA samples for structural studies.

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Biomolecular Interactions


photo of John McDermottJohn McDermott (biology)

Title: Professor and McLaughlin Research Chair
Academic History: PhD (Dalhousie)
Office Location: 427B LSB
Email: jmcderm@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 30344

Research Interests:
Animal Biology/Physiology, Cell-Signaling, Molecular Biology

Our research interest concerns the basic regulatory mechanisms involved in cellular differentiation. This work is primarily undertaken using muscle cells as a model system and is aimed at understanding the role of transcription factors in orchestrating muscle-specific differentiation.


Sergey Krylov headshotSergey Krylov

Title: Professor, Canada Research Chair
Academic History: PhD (Moscow State University),
Office Location: 340 PSE
Email: skrylov@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 22345 (L 22817)

Research Interests:
Bioanalytical Chemistry

This research group focuses on the development of new bioanalytical methods and instrumentation for multi-component analysis of single cells. The techniques are primarily based on separating the chemical contents of individual cells by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The molecules of interest are proteins, enzymes, and DNA. Chemical analysis methods are combined with advanced cell biology techniques such as fluorescence image cytometry. The developed bioanalytical tools are applied to study the molecular mechanisms of fundamental biological processes (cell cycle, cell differentiation, apoptosis) and human health disorders (cancer, Alzheimer disease).

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Biomolecular Interactions


Andrew White photoAndrew White (biology)

Title: Professor
Academic History: PhD (Western Ontario)
Office Location: B304 FB
Email: kawhite@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 40890

Research Interests:
Virology, Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, Genetics, Transcription, Translation, and RNA structure/function

Molecular mechanisms of replication, transcription and translation of a plus-sense RNA plant virus.


Derek Wilson photoDerek Wilson

<Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (Western Ontario)
Office Location: 318 CB
Email: dkwilson@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 20786

Research Interests:
Protein Dynamics, Microfluidics, Time-resolved Mass Spectrometry, Biophysical NMR

Research is focused on the relationship between the conformational motions of proteins in solution (their dynamics) and their biological activity. The primary tool is Time- Resolved Electrospray Mass Spectrometry, a method that allows a wide range of active biochemical processes to be monitored on short (millisecond-to-second) timescales. This technique is combined with a number of other techniques, including biophysical NMR and H/D exchange to obtain a highly detailed, dynamic picture of protein function. There is also a significant technology development component to the work.

Affiliations:
Centre for Research in Biomolecular Interactions


Centre for atmospheric chemistry (CAC)

The Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry was the first university based center of its kind anywhere. Facilities include an environmental chamber, mobile laboratories for trace gas and particulate analysis, and many specialized instruments. Students have the opportunity to participate in field projects with scientists from many other organizations.

Please visit York Research for more information.

Prof. Jan Bottenheim headshotJan Bottenheim (adjunct)

Title: Adjunct Professor
Academic History: PhD (V.U. Amst.)
Office Location: 006 SSEB
Email: jan.bottenheim@ec.gc.ca
Website: Research Page
Phone: 416 736 5410

Research Interests:
Atmospheric Photochemistry, Computer Modelling, Arctic Air Chemistry

Affiliations:
Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry


Donald Hastie photoDonald Hastie

Title: Professor & Chair of the Chemistry Department
Academic History: PhD (Canterbury)
Office Location: 305 PSE
Email: hastie@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 5388 (L 77766)

Research Interests:
Atmospheric Chemistry

Understanding the chemical and meteorological processes responsible for the production of ozone and particulate matter in the lower atmosphere. The development and use of spectroscopic instruments to measure the chemical composition of the atmosphere. Laboratory studies on the production of particulate matter from hydrocarbon oxidation.

Affiliations:
Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry


Robert McLaren headshotRobert McLaren

Title: Associate Professor
Academic History: PhD (Alberta)
Office Location: 301 PSE
Email: rmclaren@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 2100 ext. 30675 (L 70456)

Research Interests:
Atmospheric Chemistry

Research interests are in the chemistry of air contaminants in the polluted atmosphere, including their sources, transformations and sinks. Developing analytical methods to characterize the organic and inorganic composition of the gaseous and particulate phases of the troposphere. Focus is on the measurement of oxygenated organic species. Research tools include modern instrumental methods of analysis, applied both in the laboratory and in field studies.

Affiliations:
Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry


Shao-Meng Li

Title: Adjunct Professor
Academic History: PhD (Florida State)
Office Location: 006 SSEB
Email: lshao-meng.li@ec.gc.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 736 5410

Research Interests:
Atmospheric Chemistry


Jochen Rudolph photoJochen Rudolph

Title: Professor
Academic History: PhD (Darmstadt)
Office Location: 006 SSEB
Email: rudolphj@yorku.ca
Website: Profile Page
Phone: 416 650 8117 (L 44608)

Research Interests:
Atmospheric Chemistry

Organic trace substances in the atmosphere: Sources, sinks, reactions, atmospheric distributions, and impact on the chemistry of the troposphere. Use of isotope ratios to study the processing and origin of gas and particle phase organic compounds in the atmosphere. Measurement techniques for concentration and isotope ratios of organic substances in the atmosphere.

Affiliations:
Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry
Centre for Research in Mass Spectrometry